Call for abstract and case studies for Volume Research on 'ICT in Education'

NELTA, in partnership with the British Council, is producing a book on using technology to support remote teaching and learning. This book aims to explore the ways that technology has been used to support school students’ (5-18 ) learning outside of the classroom in developing countries, and in Nepal in particular. It is divided into three sections: general overview; experiences during COVID; case studies.

How to apply

Please refer to the Request for Proposals document for detailed information. All proposals should be submitted to sudarshan.subedi@britishcouncil.org.np (copy to ccnelta@gmail.com ) and should be received by 23.59 on 21 June 2021.

 

Using Technology to Support Remote Teaching and Learning in Developing Countries

This book aims to explore the ways that technology has been used to support school students’ (5-18) learning outside of the classroom in developing countries, and in Nepal in particular. It is divided into three sections: general overview; experiences during COVID; case studies.

Section 1: Using technology to support remote teaching and learning in developing countries: an overview

Many schools have introduced blended learning – a mix of classroom and at home learning – through the use of virtual learning environments and similar networks in recent years. In addition, there have been cases of fully remote learning for students unable to attend school using broadcast media and mobile devices. These innovations gathered pace with the Covid-19 pandemic and some teachers and policy makers have been adept in supporting their students when schools have been closed. Students, too, have shown resilience and initiative in learning through social media and education networks such as Khan Academy. However, there have been considerable challenges and limitations on learning outside the classroom and a deep digital divide in developing countries.

This first chapter gives us an opportunity to provide an overview of the use of technology to support remote, or out-of-classroom, learning. We are looking for a report on innovations in developing countries (or ‘global south’) in which access to school and to online resources can be problematic for many children.

The author(s) of this chapter will carry out desk-based research covering not just academic articles but also reports from governments, NGOs and intergovernmental organisations. The aim is to provide an overview of which technologies have been promoted and why; what has been the impact of technology use; and what lessons are there to take forward. The review is likely to consider, but is not confined to, experiences during the COVID 19 pandemic.

This chapter will be between 8,000 – 8,500 words and we ask interested authors to mail an abstract of between 300 - 400 words of proposed content.

Section 2: Using technology to support remote teaching and learning during the covid 19 pandemic: what has happened in South Asia and in Nepal in particular?

This section consists of two chapters, one looking at experiences in South Asian countries (these are Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh, the Maldives, and Sri Lanka) and the second on leading responses in Nepal.

Chapter 1: The Use of technology to support remote learning technologies during the Covid19 pandemic: responses in South Asia

During the COVID pandemic, teachers, school leaders and policy makers have had to adjust rapidly to the unexpected closure of schools. This has created major challenges for practitioners, parents and carers, young people and for society in general. Policy makers have innovated by, for example, providing educational content through broadcast media and teachers have provided one-to-one support and online whole class teaching.

The use of technology has been core to meeting the challenge of teaching and learning during the pandemic. However, technology has provided not just opportunities but also significant challenges. Many young people, particularly in rural areas, cannot access computers and have been reliant on television, radio and mobile devices. Teachers and students have been required to learn new ways of working and to show considerable resilience. This chapter provides an overview of the response to the pandemic in South Asia detailing the technologies used and the challenge of rapid innovation with technology. This will be largely desk-based research covering not just academic articles but also reports from governments, NGOs and intergovernmental organisations.

This chapter will be between 5,000 - 6,000 words and interested authors are asked to mail an abstract of between 250 - 300 words of proposed content.

Chapter 2: What have we learnt about teacher development in Nepal during the COVID 19 pandemic?

We have a particular interest in the challenges faced by teachers when trying to support their students and in the teacher journey, in particular the ways in which some teachers have developed confidence and competence in the use of technology. We want to know what helps teacher development, what works in respect to leading change in school and the constraints and limitations on development. We also want to know what we can learn from the experience of teaching with technology during the COVID 19 pandemic that can help us in the future. Authors will be expected to access reports in both specialist and general publications and to interview practitioner carrying out case studies, as detailed in section three below, to gain additional insight.

This chapter will be between 5,000 - 6,000 words and interested authors are asked to mail an abstract of between 250 - 300 words of proposed content. 

Section Three: Case studies illustrating the use of technology to support out of classroom learning in Nepal

We are including seven or eight case studies which will focus on different aspects of the use of technology to support teaching and learning during the COVID 19 pandemic in Nepal. We are interested in understanding the range of technology that has been used; if and how teachers have found ways of getting round limited access to technology; the ways in which knowledge and skills have developed; and what has helped or limited the effectiveness of teacher responses. We are interested in in different contexts, for example teachers working in both rural and urban schools. The cases studies can involve you, as a practitioner, a trainer or a community member, reflecting on your experiences and might include some further evaluation, for example focus group discussions with students or short interviews with colleagues. Suggested titles include:

  • How I supported hard-to-reach students?
  • My teacher journey - moving from reluctance to competence to creativity with technology?
  • Home schooling – how this worked for us?
  • Teaching and learning from television and radio
  • The role of parents and caregivers during lock down
  • What I learnt about leading my school during lockdown.
  • What technology worked… and what did not.

These titles are indicative only and we would welcome suggestions of your own. Most of these case studies will be written by teachers but we would also welcome suggestions from other stakeholders, for example community leaders and radio and television broadcasters.

Each case study will be between 2,000 - 2,500 words and will follow a common template.

Interested authors are asked to submit a description of their proposed case study of between 150 -200 words by 21 June 2021.

Time scale

All proposals should be submitted to sudarshan.subedi@britishcouncil.org.np and should be received by 23.59 on 21 June 2021. We will aim to commission the case studies at the beginning of July and will expect a work in progress report by mid-August and a final draft by 30 September. Following any small changes, the final print version will be agreed by 31 October, 2021. We will support authors not familiar with writing case studies with feedback and advice.

For questions please contact the editor Michael Hammond (m.hammond@warwick.ac.uk) or, at the British Council, Vaishali Pradhan, Head of English and Education (vaishali.pradhan@britishcouncil.org.np).


Notice Details

Posted on :4th June, 2021
Posted by : NELTA
Updated at : 8th June, 2021

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